Huntington University is a Christian liberal arts college in Indiana
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mathematics department

Huntington’s Department of Mathematics offers Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science in Science, and Bachelor of Science degrees in multiple tracks to prepare students for their exact career after graduation.

Individualized Degree Options

At HU, students can specify their degree options to target their future degree:

  • Theoretical: A general math track for students who would wish to take a more traditional path to their degree.
  • Computational: A track for students interested in math and computer programming.
  • Actuarial: A formalized track for students interested in an actuarial career.

Variety of Career Options

There is great demand today for individuals with strong analytical skills and experience in the development of new technologies. Our programs in the mathematical sciences will help you prepare for a wide variety of careers requiring problem solving, logical reasoning, and the application of modern technology. Students also gain hands-on experience through internships. Students have worked for such companies as Brotherhood Mutual, Bendix, American Specialties and local schools.

alumni impact

Advantages of a Christian college education at Huntington University

Jarod Hammel

Math Education '10

Jarod sets the bar high for his students and himself.

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news & events

Two Huntington University math students shined in the nationally accredited William Lowell Putnam Mathematical Competition, scoring high on the difficult exam.

Dobbs invited to speak at Purdue University Probability Seminar

Dobbs invited to speak at Purdue University Probability Seminar

01/15/2014

Dr. Dan Dobbs, assistant professor mathematics, was an invited speaker on Dec. 5 at the Purdue University probability seminar sponsored by Dr. Jon Peterson. Dobbs presented a talk titled, “Small deviations for an element of second order chaos.” The research was a joint work with Prof. Tai Melcher at the University of Virginia.